Sexchatt pay by mobile sweden intimidating trio

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The syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger.Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee's hand. What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter.Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues.The company also recently branched out into lending, based on data from usage of the card readers that can be used to predict future revenues.i Zettle is reportedly valued at 0 million (£325 million), according to the Financial Times.The region is already home to a so-called fintech "unicorn" — a startup worth over

The syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger.Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee's hand. What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter.Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues.The company also recently branched out into lending, based on data from usage of the card readers that can be used to predict future revenues.i Zettle is reportedly valued at $500 million (£325 million), according to the Financial Times.The region is already home to a so-called fintech "unicorn" — a startup worth over $1 billion — and small business banking startup Holvi, founded in Finland, was bought by Spanish banking giant BBVA back in March (for that reason, we've not included it on the list.) We have rounded up the 16 most exciting fintech businesses from the region below. It recently raised €2 million (£1.43 million, $2.2 million) and loan applications worth SEK 400 million (£35 million) have been made since launch, according to its annual report. The company is used by most Nordic banks, with millions of customers unknowingly using its technology. The app also automatically categorises and analyses spending and lets users send payments from their different accounts straight from the app. The company announced a similar deal with Santander in November, with CEO .

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The syringe slides in between the thumb and index finger.

Then, with a click, a microchip is injected in the employee's hand. What could pass for a dystopian vision of the workplace is almost routine at the Swedish startup hub Epicenter.

Epicenter and a handful of other companies are the first to make chip implants broadly available.

And as with most new technologies, it raises security and privacy issues.

The company also recently branched out into lending, based on data from usage of the card readers that can be used to predict future revenues.

billion — and small business banking startup Holvi, founded in Finland, was bought by Spanish banking giant BBVA back in March (for that reason, we've not included it on the list.) We have rounded up the 16 most exciting fintech businesses from the region below. It recently raised €2 million (£1.43 million, .2 million) and loan applications worth SEK 400 million (£35 million) have been made since launch, according to its annual report. The company is used by most Nordic banks, with millions of customers unknowingly using its technology. The app also automatically categorises and analyses spending and lets users send payments from their different accounts straight from the app. The company announced a similar deal with Santander in November, with CEO .

The OECD Better Life Index pegs the annual total at just 1,612 hours per year, compared to 1,790 in the U.

The company offers to implant its workers and startup members with microchips the size of grains of rice that function as swipe cards: to open doors, operate printers, or buy smoothies with a wave of the hand.

The injections have become so popular that workers at Epicenter hold parties for those willing to get implanted.

Financial technology, better known as fintech, is absolutely exploding around the world right now, with new businesses springing up doing everything from online lending to handling cryptocurrencies. What it does: Sweden's first peer-to-peer lending platform, focusing on consumer loans. What it does: Pleo provides a "smart" company credit card for employees to use that automatically captures receipts and categorizes spending. Well-known early stage London tech venture capital fund Passion Capital invested in the platform, although the amount was not disclosed. The company raised an undisclosed funding round in the "multi-millions" in September 2014, according to Coin Desk, and Based: Stockholm, Sweden. The platform has over 68,000 members who have invested over €23 million (£19.3 million) into 449 companies. The startup is only 11-months old but has already launched a closed beta trial of its product, a debit card linked to its app. Hedge funds can market themselves to would-be invetors while institutional investors can easily shop around to find the best deal for them. The startup has also launched a product to help hedge funds send live data to clients. What it does: Originally launched as m Cash but rebranded as Auka earlier this year, the startup built a payment app that lets people pay friends from their smartphone or pay merchants in-store straight from the app. What it does: Meniga builds personal finance management tools that it sells to banks to then give to its customers.

London has emerged as a capital of fintech in Europe but Nordic countries — Denmark, Sweden, Iceland, Norway, and Finland — also have a flourishing scene. The company launched to the public in April 2015 after a soft launching in September 2014. It is also linked to an app for both employers and staff so they can add notes and track spending. So far DKR 28 million (£3.1 million) has been lent over the platform. Customers can check their balance, move money, and make payments through the app. It has an exclusive deal with rovides a layer of so-called biometric security that lets banks tell who you are just from the way you type, move your mouse, or touch your phone screen. What it does: Tink is a personal finance app that lets people keep track of their money by seeing all their accounts in one app. It works with banks including Skandia, ING, and Islandsbanki, reaching 25 million people across 16 countries.

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