School based dating violence prevention programs

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School-based prevention programs were found to be successful in having a significant impact on dating violence knowledge and attitudes and, unlike victimization experiences, changes in knowledge were sustained over time.Author Affiliations: Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Centre for Prevention Science, London, Ontario (Drs Wolfe and Crooks, Ms Chiodo, and Mr Hughes); Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Ontario (Dr Wolfe); Faculty of Education and Centre for Research and Education on Violence Against Women and Children (Dr Jaffe), Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Mr Stitt and Dr Donner), and King's University College, The University of Western Ontario, London (Dr Ellis); and Thames Valley District School Board, London (Mr Hughes), Canada.Researchers found that, compared with the control group who received no intervention, students who received the school-level intervention or both the school- and classroom-level interventions experienced reduced levels of dating violence and sexual harassment.

This review focused on prevention and intervention efforts implemented in schools that sought to reduce or prevent incidents of dating violence.

Adolescent dating violence is linked to numerous individual, peer, family, and sociocultural risk factors, which makes identification and treatment on the basis of individual risk factors nonfeasible and prevention more fitting.

The ultimate goal of prevention and intervention is to stop dating violence before it begins.

Classroom-level interventions were delivered in six sessions, using a curriculum emphasizing the consequences for perpetrators, state laws and penalties, the construction of gender roles, and healthy relationships.

School-level interventions included the use of temporary school-based restraining orders, higher levels of faculty and security presence in "hot spots," and raising awareness schoolwide.

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