Prehistoric dating

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Join us to discover the top twenty most fascinating prehistoric cave paintings.

Known as "the prehistoric Sistine Chapel," the Lascaux Caves, a cave complex in southwestern France, contain some of the most remarkable paleolithic cave paintings in the world, from at least 15,000 years ago.

The fabulous caves of Altamira are located near Santilliana del Mar in Cantabria, Northern Spain, about 30 kms. As is so often the case they were discovered by chance.

In 1868 a hunter by the name of Modesto Cubillas stumbled across them but they were not properly explored until 1875 by a nobleman from Santander named Marcellino Sanz de Santuola but it was his daughter, Maria de Santuola who discovered the wonderful cave paintings of Altamira in 1879.

The cupule, for instance - a mysterious type of Paleolithic cultural marking - amounts to no more than a hemispherical or cup-like scouring of the rock surface.In the history of art, prehistoric art is all art produced in preliterate, prehistorical cultures beginning somewhere in very late geological history, and generally continuing until that culture either develops writing or other methods of record-keeping, or makes significant contact with another culture that has, and that makes some record of major historical events.At this point ancient art begins, for the older literate cultures.• Introduction • Types • Characteristics • Dating & Chronology • Prehistoric Culture • Human Evolution: From Axes to Art • Paleolithic Period • Lower Paleolithic (c.2.5 million - 200,000 BCE) • Middle Paleolithic (c.200,000 - 40,000 BCE) • Upper Paleolithic (c.40,000-10,000 BCE) • Mesolithic Culture - 10,000 - 4,000 BCE - Northern and Western Europe - 10,000 - 7,000 BCE - Southeast Europe - 10,000 - 8,000 BCE - Middle East and Rest of World • Neolithic Culture - 4,000 - 2,000 BCE: Northern and Western Europe - 7,000 - 2,000 BCE: Southeast Europe - 8,000 - 2,000 BCE: Middle East & Rest of World • Bronze Age Art (In Europe, 3000-1200 BCE) • Iron Age Art (In Europe, 1500-200 BCE)Types Archeologists have identified 4 basic types of Stone Age art, as follows: petroglyphs (cupules, rock carvings and engravings); pictographs (pictorial imagery, ideomorphs, ideograms or symbols), a category that includes cave painting and drawing; and prehistoric sculpture (including small totemic statuettes known as Venus Figurines, various forms of zoomorphic and therianthropic ivory carving, and relief sculptures); and megalithic art (petroforms or any other works associated with arrangements of stones).Artworks that are applied to an immoveable rock surface are classified as parietal art; works that are portable are classified as mobiliary art.

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